Literati identity and its fictional representations in late imperial China

by Stephen Roddy

Publisher: Stanford University Press in Stanford, Calif

Written in English
Cover of: Literati identity and its fictional representations in late imperial China | Stephen Roddy
Published: Pages: 315 Downloads: 374
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Subjects:

  • Wu, Jingzi, 1701-1754,
  • Xia, Jingqu,
  • Li, Ruzhen, ca. 1763-ca. 1830,
  • Chinese fiction -- Qing dynasty, 1644-1912 -- History and criticism,
  • Scholars in literature

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [291]-304) and index.

Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. Stanford: Stanford University Press: Sato, Masayuki. The Confucian Quest for Order: The Origin and Formation of the Political Thought of Xun Zi. Sinica Leidensia, no. Leiden and Boston: Brill, Shryock, John K. Both of these books deal extensively with printed and painted pictures made during the Ming dynasty (), commonly designated as part of the late imperial era. Clunas and others, however, refer to the years as China's early modern period, in part to challenge Eurocentric definitions of modernization and modernity, but also to recognize global connections linking the economy of.   Hangzhou, China: Zhejiang renmin chubanshe, E-mail Citation» Though written in a lively, relaxed style for a nonscholarly audience, this erudite work is a treasure trove of literary references to literati arts and culture from the Han dynasty to the early s. Elman, Benjamin. A Cultural History of Civil Examinations in Late Imperial. This is the first book-length study of the representation of male homosexuality in late imperial Chinese fiction, arguably one of the richest sources on the homosexual tradition in premodern China. The title of the book's first chapter, “Male Beauty,” is an English translation of the Chinese word nanse, which, as Giovanni Vitiello.

Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, Ropp, Paul S. Banished Immortal: Searching for Shuangqing, China's Peasant Woman Poet. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, Roy, David, trans. The Plum in the Golden Vase or, Chin P'ing Mei. Volume One: "The Gathering.". Mount Tai in northeastern China has long been a sacred site. Indeed, it epitomizes China's religious and social diversity. Throughout history, it has been a magnet for both women and men from all classes--emperors, aristocrats, officials, literati, and villagers. For much of the past millennium, however, the vast majority of pilgrims were illiterate peasants who came to pray for their deceased. The Art Book of Chinese Paintings de Ming Deng. Publicat per Long River Press. ISBN Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China de Stephen J. Roddy. Stanford University Press. Pàg, 98, , , , , , i Mount Tai in northeastern China has long been a sacred site. Throughout history, it has been a magnet for both women and men from all classes -- emperors, aristocrats, officials, literati, and villagers. This book examines the behavior of those who made the pilgrimage to Mount Tai and their interpretations of its sacrality and history, as a means of better understanding their identities and.

  In this learned, yet readable, book, Joseph McDermott introduces the history of the book in China in the late imperial period from to He assumes little knowledge of Chinese history or culture and compares the Chinese experience with /5(1). The novel Water Margin (Shuihu zhuan), China's earliest full-length narrative in vernacular prose, first appeared in print in the sixteenth century. The tale of one hundred and eight bandit heroes evolved from a long oral tradition; in its novelized form, it played a pivotal role in the rise of Chinese vernacular fiction, which flourished.   In James Cahill’s own words, the goal of Pictures for Use and Pleasure is to facilitate “further, deeper, and altogether better studies” of the proposed category of vernacular paintings (). The interest is in finding, sorting, and identifying such paintings according to their subject areas; in making (corrective) attributions with suggested dates, artists’ names, and styles; and in.

Literati identity and its fictional representations in late imperial China by Stephen Roddy Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China (): Roddy, Stephen J.: BooksCited by: Literati Identity and Its Fictional L E V F N S 0 N Representations in P R I Z F Late Imperial China STEPHEN J.

ROD DY NOW IN PAPERBACK Examining three works of Awakening China vernacular fiction dating Politics, Culture, and from tothis book studies the intellectual Class in the Nationalist and literary factors that in. Literati identity and its fictional representations in late imperial China. By Stephen J.

Roddy, pp. Stanford, California, Stanford University Press. Author: Denise Gimpel. Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, xii, pp. Hardcover $, isbn In the academic study of late imperial China, fictional and philosophical sources are usually tapped by different scholars, so much so that fiction and philosophy seem to.

The above summary may suggest the range, but cannot do full justice to the complexity of Professor Roddy's argument. Literati Identity and its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China is an important contribution to the quickly expanding fields of Qing-dynasty intellectual history and Qing-dynasty vernacular fiction.

Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China by Stephen J Roddy starting at $ Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China has 0 available edition to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

Literati identity and its fictional representations in late imperial China / Stephen J. Roddy. and aesthetic treatises as parallel if not wholly identical aims to redefine literati identity, the book attempts to advance our understanding of the intersections and overlaps between literary and discursive practices of late traditional China.

Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China 作者: Stephen Roddy 出版社: Stanford University Press 出版年: 页数: 定价: USD 装帧:. A Social History of the Chinese Book: Books and Literati Culture in Late Imperial China Joseph McDermott This book deals with a wide range of issues on the history of the book in late imperial China ( to ), mainly concerned with literati publications and readers in the lower Yangzi delta.

Rulin waishi (The Unofficial History of the Scholars) is more than a landmark in the history of the Chinese eighteenth-century work, which was deeply embedded in the intellectual and literary discourses of its time, challenges the reader to come to grips with the mid-Qing debates over ritual and ritualism, and the construction of history, narrative, and lyricism.

His book, Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China, examines several significant works of fiction in eighteenth-century China. His research centers on the nexus of literary and intellectual trends in eighteenth- and nineteenth-entury China and Japan.

Book Description: Mount Tai in northeastern China has long been a sacred site. Indeed, it epitomizes China’s religious and social diversity. Throughout history, it has been a magnet for both women and men from all classes—emperors, aristocrats, officials, literati, and villagers.

TY - BOOK TI - Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China AU - Roddy, Stephen J. SP - CY - Stanford PB - Stanford University Press.

This book introduces the history of the book in China in the late imperial period from to The book assumes little knowledge of Chinese history or culture and compares the Chinese experience with books of other civilizations, particularly the European civilization.

It deals with a wide range of issues in the history of the book in China and presents analyses of the changes in Chinese. The frequent appearance of androgyny in Ming and Qing literature has long interested scholars of late imperial Chinese culture.

A flourishing economy, widespread education, rising individualism, a prevailing hedonism--all of these had contributed to the gradual disintegration of traditional gender roles in late Ming and early Qing China () and given rise to the phenomenon of androgyny.

Wu was born into a well-to-do family. His father Wu Linqi (吳霖起) was a Qing official, but Wu Jingzi himself met with no attempted the Jinshi examination, but placed only at the county level. Poverty stricken by the age of thirty-two, he moved to Nanjing, where he met and acquainted himself with many government officials.

Wu's family may have had ties to the famous philosophers. Sharper Image Literati Color Wireless E-book E -reader W Free Books W Box. The Sharper - $ Literati Identity And Its Fictional Representations In Late Imperial China, H Literati Identity - $ Literati Identity And Its Fictional Representations In Late Imperial China New.

Vintage Chinese - $   Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. The Scholars. Ameliorative Satire and the Seventeenth-century Chinese Novel, Xingshi Yinyuan Zhuan-marriage as Retribution, Awakening the World. This study of the Chinese novel in the eighteenth century, arguably one of the greatest periods of the genre, focuses on the autobiographical features of three important works: The Dream of the Red Chamber, or The Story of the Stone (Honglou meng), The Scholars (Rulin waishi), and the relatively neglected The Humble Words of an Old Rustic (Yesou puyan).

The author seeks for answers to the. Previous work has either praised the book for being progressive for its time, or criticized it for its failure to achieve contemporary standards of sexuality equality. Literati Identity and its Fictional Representation in Late Imperial China.

Stanford: Stanford University Press, Rojas, Carlos. In imperial China, intellectuals devoted years of their lives to passing rigorous examinations in order to obtain a civil service position in the state bureaucracy. This traditional employment of the literati class conferred social power and moral legitimacy, but changing social and political circumstances in the Ming (–) and Qing.

His book, Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China, examines several significant works of fiction in eighteenth-century China. His research centers on the nexus of literary and intellectual trends in eighteenth- and nineteenth-entury China and Japan.

Sun Jiang is Professor of History at Nanjing University. This work explores significant physical aspects of the printed book in late imperial China to reconstruct the changing assumptions with which Chinese popular novels were originally read from the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries.

It focuses on the previously neglected areas of book format, varieties of illustrations and their significance Author: Professor of Asian Languages and Near Eastern Languages and Literatures Robert E Hegel. This comprehensive introduction to Chinese aesthetics and literature includes the major modern genres of poetry, fiction, and drama.

Featuring the work of renowned scholars in Chinese studies, the book provides an historical survey of Chinese literature and explains its philosophical and historical underpinnings in Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian thought.

Mount Tai in northeastern China has long been a sacred site. Indeed, it epitomizes China's religious and social diversity. Throughout history, it has been a magnet for both women and men from all classes?emperors, aristocrats, officials, literati, and villagers.

For much of the past millennium, however, the vast majority of pilgrims were illiterate peasants who came to pray for their deceased. Literati and self representation: Au-tobiographical sensibility in the eighteenth-century novel.

Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Huang, M. Desire and fictional narrative in late imperial China. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center.

Plaks, A. The four masterworks of the Ming novel: S u t a c h ’ i - s h u. The Beauty and the Book: Women and Fiction in Nineteenth-Century China.

Ellen Widmer. Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. Article. Aug. Wu Ching-Tzu Born in Anhwei Province; died in Yangzhou.

Chinese humanist writer. Wu Ching-tzu opposed the foreign Manchu dynasty. He renounced a career as an official and in moved to Nanking, where he lived in poverty. He wrote the satirical novel An Unofficial History of the Literati (published ; Russian translation, ), which.

As the first full-length survey of late Qing fiction by a single author in English, David Der-wei Wang's Fin-de-siecle Splendor is a major contribution to scholarship on late imperial and twentieth-century Chinese fiction. Wang cogently argues that late Qing fiction is considerably more innovative and "modern" than many literary historians and.

Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, Rouzer, Paul F. Articulated Ladies: Gender and the Male Community in Early Chinese Texts.

Yenching Institute Monograph Series, Vol. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, S Return to the top. The Scholars and the State: Fiction as Political Discourse in late Imperial China, by Liangyan Ge. Seattle: University of Washington Press, Pp. $50 (harcover). This book is about how the complex and changing relationship between the imperial state and scholars (also known as literati) shaped the writing and reading of Chinese.

In my book “Negotiating Masculinities in Late Imperial China," I attempt to examine how masculinities are represented and re/negotiated in works of different cultural discourses (poetry, fiction, historiography, Confucian classics, political treatises, conduct books, etc.) during the late imperial period.Raphals, Lisa.

Sharing the Light: Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China. Albany: State University of New York Press, Roddy, Stephen J.

"The Philological Musings of Jinghua yuan," in his Literati Identity and Its Fictional Representations in Late Imperial China. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press,